January 29, 2004
Unheimlich

Wanted-Poster1972forStore.jpg

I always wanted to write an essay on all the irreplaceable things I've lost, ruined, or destroyed. Stuff along the lines of "this one of a kind item" we've all cried laughing over. ("So, you're done with that, then?")

I always thought that my essay would center around one specific object: my original Baader-Meinhof 1971 wanted poster, which was crumpled up and thrown out by a cleaning woman in 2001. That in this collision of the Baader-Meinhof gang, some ad guy in Brooklyn, and a cleaning woman from the Bronx, a void opened up.

Something about a poster for people who were missing, which became a poster of people who were dead, how that poster survived 30 years only to end up in a brooklyn dumpster. How there are some things we do that we can never undo, and how that has some physical analogue. How that idea lives in objects.

It's not a poster they'll ever run again. There's not a day I don't look at where it used to be in my apartment, there's not a day I don't check my automated eBay search. But today, this loss is diminished and transformed, because today I just bought a reproduction of that poster, from the one place I should have been looking the whole time: The Baader Meinhof Gift Store. There are echoes, and echoes of echoes, and there's feedback, and there's silence, and somewhere in that poster I could find each of these.

Posted by kevin slavin at January 29, 2004 02:44 PM
Comments

Have you no WORK to do?

Posted by: Kio on January 29, 2004 03:38 PM

WE WILL DEFLECT IT AND WE WILL LIVE! E-MAIL ME IF UYOU THINK THAT WE CANT AND TELL ME WHY NOT

Posted by: Kevin Slavin on January 29, 2004 07:55 PM

my prescious

Posted by: james on January 30, 2004 10:16 AM

Here's the Baader-Meinhof blog, by the way, in case you had trouble with the google.

Posted by: Kevin Slavin on January 30, 2004 03:32 PM

I, too, have obsessed over items (artist Joseph Cornell used the wonderful term ¯ephemera¯) destroyed, lost, or, somehow, ruined. I believe it was Caligula, in Camus' play of the same name, who so poetically replied that the reason for his sadness was "For objects dekay, memories fade, and loved ones pass away." Or, perhaps, that is my poetic (mis)recollection of his reply. The inner-connective nature of all things, or at least all things we hold dear or in high esteem, is a recurring thought concept of mine. A unified field theory, of sorts, for possessions sacred & profane, lost & present. I am glad you found a replacement (inferior, of course, to the original. yet, better than a bare wall.). I, too, find a strange attraction to the images on the poster. Obviously this is the case, or I would have never encountered your comments. Did you see the bumper sticker (I am not a member of Baader-Meinhof) in the B-M store? I simply have to buy it.

Posted by: rainer on April 7, 2004 12:16 AM

I, too, have obsessed over items (artist Joseph Cornell used the wonderful term ¯ephemera¯) destroyed, lost, or, somehow, ruined. I believe it was Caligula, in Camus' play of the same name, who so poetically replied that the reason for his sadness was "For objects dekay, memories fade, and loved ones pass away." Or, perhaps, that is my poetic (mis)recollection of his reply. The inner-connective nature of all things, or at least all things we hold dear or in high esteem, is a recurring thought concept of mine. A unified-field theory, of sorts, for possessions sacred & mundane, lost & present. I am glad you found a replacement (inferior, of course, to the original. yet, better than a bare wall.). I, too, find a strange attraction to the images on the poster. Obviously this is the case, or I would have never encountered your comments. Did you see the bumper sticker (I am not a member of Baader-Meinhof) in the B-M store? I simply have to buy it.

Posted by: rainer on April 7, 2004 08:41 AM
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